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PLS-5 Additional Norms?



Question:
I’ve been using the PLS-5 Norms in 1-Month increments on the website. They work really well when I’m testing a child who is 2-10 or 2-11, but the scores are still high for children who are 2-6 (in fact, the scores are even higher than the scores in the PLS-5 manual. Why is that?
 
Answer:
The scores in the PLS-5 manual show the average score for a child in the 2:6 to 2:11 age range. When a 6-month age normative interval is used, a child who is 2:10 or 2:11 is being compared to a sample of children who are mostly younger than he or she is. The resulting score may be higher than expected. A child who is 2:6 is being compared to children who are mostly older than he or she is, so the six-month norm score may be lower than expected. The PLS-5 norms in 1-month increments can be used to compare a child to peers in the same 1-month age group. When using norms in 1-month increments, a younger child (e.g., one who is 2:6) is no longer being compared to a sample of children who are mostly older than he or she is, so the score will be higher than the 6 month norm reported in the PLS-5 manual. When using norms in 1-month increments, an older child (e.g., one who is 2:11 is no longer being compared to a sample of children who are mostly younger than he or she is, so the score will be lower than the 6 month norm reported in the manual. Children who are in the middle of the age range (e.g, age 2:9) will have scores very similar to the 6 month norms reported in the manual.

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