Lighter Side

What's the funniest thing that's happened to you at work? Please submit your favorite story to share with your colleagues. If we publish your story, we'll send you a $50 gift certificate!

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Esther Hernandez-San Antonio, TX

I was working with a group of high school student with autism. All the students had a great deal of difficulty understanding family relationships, even relationships within the immediate family. In one class, we were practicing conversation skills and talking about our families. One student leaned toward another student and asked (somewhat belligerently), “Do you HAVE a family?” Caught off guard, the respondent gasped, “I used to have a sister, but she moved to St. Louis!” Apparently, once you move away, you are out of the family.

Jessica Kulis

I was working with a female sophomore student with speech language impairment and hearing loss who recently has been having problems with wax in her ears. In the middle of a session, she stops me and tells me that people are talking about her. I stop and listen and hear nobody nearby. She says, “My ears are ringing. Someone is talking about me in the classroom.” This classroom is on a completely different floor. It took us another 20 minutes to sort out that yes she was hearing noises in her ear, but it had nothing to do with anyone talking about her. She had learned the saying about your ears ringing when someone is talking behind your back, but had taken it literally!

Janice Richards-Belleville, IL

While screening students for possible speech delays, I begin by asking questions to elicit some spontaneous speech. I posed this question to a 3rd grade boy, “What do you like best about 3rd grade? What do you like the least?” His reply, “Well, I thought I would like Social Studies, but instead of being more “social,” it’s just a lot of “studies”!

Eleene Gallagher-Flemington, NJ

I was playing a category game with my second graders. The students each had to take turns naming a member of a certain category and couldn’t repeat one that had already been named or they were out. The category was animals and one student said that humans were animals. After a bit another student named camels. The first student claimed that he had already said that. I checked my list and said that no one had said camels yet. The first student adamantly responded that he had said it, saying that we are all camels. It took me a minute to figure out he meant mammals. We all had a laugh at that one.

Eileen Edwards-Stafford, VA

I have a group of first grade boys who are working on improving their articulation and language skills. While picking one of them up from their classroom one day, my student wanted to remind me not to forget one of the other boys. This young man wanted to say “Don’t forget Mateo,” however, he cannot articulate the other boy’s name very well so he said “Don’t forget tomato!”

Janice Richards-Belleville, IL

While screening students for possible speech delays, I begin by asking questions to elicit some spontaneous speech. I posed this question to a 3rd grade boy, “What do you like best about 3rd grade? What do you like the least?” His reply, “Well, I thought I would like Social Studies, but instead of being more “social”, it’s just a lot of “studies”!

Amy Leitzinger-York, PA

My co-worker is working with a middle school student, Logan, trying to improve articulation and his response to questions. They are talking about school rules.

Chad: “What are some of the rules here at school?”

Logan: “Listen to the teacher, obey…hey, wait, obey! You know, that stuff we put on crabs!”

Jennifer Dickens-Amory, MS

Several years ago, I was in the regular classroom of several of my Pre-K students. One language impaired boy always had issues with correct pronoun usage. It was October and the Pre-K teacher was asking each student about their Halloween costume. This little red-headed fella said, “Me gonna be a pumpkin.” Immediately, his teacher said, “I am going to be a pumpkin” to model correct production He looked up at her with wide eyes and exclaimed, “Me too!”

Paula Reaves

I was preparing to work on grammar with a group of second grade students. As I was taking attendance, one of my girls said, “Where did you got them earrings?” I was trying to see if she could correct herself, so I said, “Where did I what?” She asked again and I repeated my question. We went back and forth about 3-4 times. She thought I couldn’t understand what she was saying so she said it very slowly. “Where-did-you-got-them-earrings?” I had to laugh to myself and correct her since she clearly saw nothing wrong with the way she said it.

Connie Potter

I was taking a preschool language impaired kid back to his mom after speech therapy. He said “Me had fun today.” In an attempt to correct his grammar, I replied, “I had fun today.” He responded by saying, “Me too!”